Workshop Seminars

11:00 - 12:00

Neurodiversity: An Immersive Examination of Built Environments and Accessibility

Join us for this exciting immersive workshop and experience first-hand examples of different environments and some of the challenges that neurodiverse people encounter, either as users or employees, as we help to build the template for truly accessible environments for everyone.
Designed by Caudwell Children in collaboration with experts by experience, during this group workshop you will spend time in spaces carefully re-created to highlight some of the challenges people face in the built environment.
Flickering lights, noisy air conditioning, overwhelming communication or overpowering smells can all be common pitfalls of designers, estates or employers who fail to consider a neurodiverse population.
We will explore the potential causes of bad practice (e.g budget constraints, product innovation gaps, outdated guidelines, lack of awareness) and identify practical solutions by listening to a wide range of stakeholders including designers, architects, facility managers and experts by experience.
As employers and service providers across the world begin to recognise neurodiversity within their workforce and service users, many environments still struggle to meet the needs of many neurodiverse people. In this immersive workshop we will re-create some typical spaces, identify the potential pitfalls and aim to create an inclusive, accessible alternative.
This interactive experience will feature some examples of poor practice and participants will be invited to experience potentially heightened sensory stimuli.
Light, sound, smell, furniture, communication, colour, management practices and other environmental influences will all be examined as groups work towards creating a template of best practice by recognising how different people may experience stereotypical spaces.
Attendees will have the option to not participate in the immersive elements of the workshop, but can still take part and contribute to the evidence gathering and discussion.
The results of the workshop and a ‘Accessible Template’ based on the discussion will be posted as a blog on the DIMHN website within 6 weeks of the conference.
This workshop is delivered by national charity, Caudwell Children.

Speaker:

14:35 - 15:35

Mental Health on the High Street

1 in 4 people experience a mental health problem of some kind each year, and the biggest current concern for these people is the problem with accessing support. Shortage of providers is now critical and staff burnout prevention has become a major concern. The workshop shall aim to look at means of making mental health support more accessible. The primary focus being to improve the social connection through MH cafes & creating healthy wellbeing spaces for patients and staff. Ensuring easy access with free wifi and levelling up home access to those in need. Exploring where the journey begins, and what means can be reviewed and enhanced to create better education and prevention. Investigating ways on how we can destigmatise Mental Health so that it is easily accessible to all.

Speaker:

16:00 - 17:00

Designing Buildings for Truly Person-Centred Care – How Do We Create a New Standard for Inpatient Environments That Improves Each Individual’s Recovery?

We are all different. What makes each of us tick and feel able and well to tackle the challenges of the world is different. How to we find comfort and wellbeing away from home?

We know that personalised and flexible spaces are the result of choice and create the opportunity for individualised care and recovery. Having choice is a fundamental requirement of freedom that is often reduced or removed in In-patient environments. But mental health inpatient settings are regularly designed around a set of core spaces and standardised repeatable rooms, with limited resources focused on how we enable truly individualised care through the building itself.

The workshop will explore key components of a typical mental health ward, striving to define what makes good design appropriate for each of us, and how this can be achieved using innovative products and technologies.

Ideal attendees will include People with Lived Experience, Clinical Staff, Estates and Facilities Teams, and Designers, and will help inform a new best practice for in-patient care environments.

Outcomes will be summarised in a paper within 6 weeks of the workshop.

Speaker:

11:00 - 12:00

Children and Young People: Designing for Diversity

Facilities for children and young people's mental health services need to accommodate a particularly diverse patient group. How do we do this well?

For example
The difference in maturity from someone 4 vs. 18 is significantly different, far greater than throughout working-adult age: 18 to 65. How do we create an environment that feels appropriate for all in this age group?

• The size of furniture, and height of fixtures and fittings vary depending on age and size.
• At earlier ages, children may not need to be separated by gender, however separation becomes necessary at older ages, as they become aware of their own sexual identity.
• There are a diverse range of patients within children and young people's mental health services with differing mental health needs. Learning disabilities vs. eating disorders, and acute vs. forensic services have quite different requirements, as do does the spectrum of neurodiversity and autism.

Challenge
• How do we accommodate specific needs of this diverse group while retaining long term flexibility?
• Can we design something that caters for all needs without looking or feeling different?
• What is the right balance between dedicated facilities that address specific needs vs. shared facilities.
• How do we separate quite different patient groups within the same ward?

 

Speaker:

14:35 - 15:35

Neurodiversity: An Immersive Examination of Built Environments and Accessibility

Join us for this exciting immersive workshop and experience first-hand examples of different environments and some of the challenges that neurodiverse people encounter, either as users or employees, as we help to build the template for truly accessible environments for everyone.
Designed by Caudwell Children in collaboration with experts by experience, during this group workshop you will spend time in spaces carefully re-created to highlight some of the challenges people face in the built environment.
Flickering lights, noisy air conditioning, overwhelming communication or overpowering smells can all be common pitfalls of designers, estates or employers who fail to consider a neurodiverse population.
We will explore the potential causes of bad practice (e.g budget constraints, product innovation gaps, outdated guidelines, lack of awareness) and identify practical solutions by listening to a wide range of stakeholders including designers, architects, facility managers and experts by experience.
As employers and service providers across the world begin to recognise neurodiversity within their workforce and service users, many environments still struggle to meet the needs of many neurodiverse people. In this immersive workshop we will re-create some typical spaces, identify the potential pitfalls and aim to create an inclusive, accessible alternative.
This interactive experience will feature some examples of poor practice and participants will be invited to experience potentially heightened sensory stimuli.
Light, sound, smell, furniture, communication, colour, management practices and other environmental influences will all be examined as groups work towards creating a template of best practice by recognising how different people may experience stereotypical spaces.
Attendees will have the option to not participate in the immersive elements of the workshop, but can still take part and contribute to the evidence gathering and discussion.
The results of the workshop and a ‘Accessible Template’ based on the discussion will be posted as a blog on the DIMHN website within 6 weeks of the conference.
This workshop is delivered by national charity, Caudwell Children.

Speaker: