Keynote Theatre Seminars

09:15 - 09:45

Good Design, Human Value

Speaker:

09:45 - 10:30

Keynote: Designing A Mentally Healthier Nation?

Inequalities in mental health are deep and entrenched. But they are not inevitable. Centre for Mental Health has explored what causes mental health inequalities and what can change them. We’ll explore the evidence for what would create a mentally healthier society for us all, and how mental health services can be more equitable: a design for a mentally healthier future.

Speaker:

  • Andy Bell Chief Executive - Centre for Mental Health
10:30 - 11:00

Break

11:00 - 11:30

Crafting for Design in Mental Health: Personalisation, Participation and Production

The idea of 'crafting' has gained significant attention in studies of design and manufacturing processes in recent years. Design in mental health is a specialised practice, placing particular demands on how design and architectural projects are approached and emphasising the pivotal role of mental health service users. Design may also be directly informed by biographies and lived experience; it is not uncommon for members of the Design in Mental Health Network to express a personal stake in their work. In this paper I want to consider how the idea of 'crafting' might help to make this relationship between design and lived experience more visible. Specifically, I want to focus on three key practices: 1) the ways in which staff seek to modify the built environment through projects which personalise ward space in ways that are meaningful to both service users and staff; 2) how service user participation in art projects can be understood as a form of crafting which intervenes within the inpatient space rather than as a therapeutic practice; 3) the extent to which the idea of crafting can be enable an alternative approach to personalisation and what the scope is for expanding this idea within the standards which govern design choices within inpatient settings.

Speaker:

11:30 - 12:00

What is Co-production and How Can You do it in the Context of the Built Environment?

In this presentation Raf will discuss his role as expert by experience lead within the largest independent provider of mental health services with the UK and give a working definition of co-production, recovery and lived experience. This will allow for the opportunity to understand the context of the presentation..

He will showcase various co-produced projects on the built environment, demonstrating how co-production and enhancements can in turn lead to improved patient outcomes and staff experience as well as a reduction in incidents and the use of force (i.e restraint, seclusion etc)

Raf will also take us on a journey to reflect on the unique proposition and insights people with lived experience bring to the table which has significantly improved patient safety from a built environment standpoint by being able to identify and mitigate risks whilst also balancing this with least restrictive practice.

Speaker:

12:00 - 13:30

Lunch

13:30 - 14:30

Keynote: Striving to become an Anti-racism Organisation in Mental Health: NHS England’s Patient and Carer Race Equality Framework

Speaker:

  • Dr Jacqui Dyer MBE Chair of the Advancing Mental Health Equalities Taskforce and the Patient and Carer Race Equality Framework Steering Group - NHS England
14:30 - 15:00

Integrating Mental and Physical Health

Advances in medical care and treatments mean that more people are living longer and there is an increased prevalence of people being diagnosed with two or more co-morbidities. Individuals are no longer divided into a mental health or physical health silo; there are a number of evidenced links between the two which identifies the need for integration. As a result, it’s important to consider the whole person and the impact of a physical condition on the mind, which if left untreated can exacerbate both illnesses and drive up the cost of an episode of care.

Speakers:

15:00 - 15:30

The Bedroom Evolved: the Thought, Theory and Lessons Learnt From a Collaborative Project to Further Mental Health Spaces

The Bedroom Evolved was Darwin Group's exhibition at DiMH 2023, constructed by Darwin Group in collaboration with numerous exhibiting consultants including Safehinge Primera, Medical Architecture, Polar and Tough Furniture.

With the ambition of progressing discussion around Mental Health bedroom design, the project went from being a concept to a physical space in a matter of weeks. Initial meetings started in February 2023, construction commenced in May, and the final project was successfully unveiled at the Design in Mental Health conference on June 7 2023.

Everyone who worked on the project had the same vision – to create a ‘real’ room that felt homely and less like a clinical setting, but at the same time, was as safe as we could possibly make it.

The result was a fully realised prototype; a 12 tonne, 32sqm space including a bedroom, en-suite and connecting corridor constructed entirely by Darwin Group in their Shropshire factory, elevating the potential of Darwin Group's approach to MMC within the Mental Health sector. With everything fitted off site, the completed room made the short trip to Coventry where it was craned into place.

In this presentation, Louis Sullivan, Principal Architect at healthcare construction specialist Darwin Group, will chronologically walk through the design of this project, exploring some of the thought process behind decisions, recollect on some of the insightful discussions we had over the two day conference, and finally share the lessons learnt and good design we will take forward into future projects.

It is hoped that through this presentation, we will be able to share some of the insightful feedback we received from fellow architects, consultants, Trusts, and experts-by-experience, with the hope that learning from the Bedroom Evolved will make its way into future built projects.

Speaker:

15:30 - 16:00

Break

16:00 - 16:20

Human Conscious Design Principles – Creating Spaces Where Everyone Can Thrive

We are all unique, our differences - shaped by age, gender, ethnicity, and ability - make up our multi-faceted and interconnected world. Over the last two years Tarkett have been carrying out research to understand how our different human make-up affects us as we go through life in education, at work and in elder care. This research has helped create 'Human Conscious Design Principles'.
For communities, organisations, and businesses to truly thrive everyone in society needs to be able to flourish. Design has a pivotal role to play here; to create spaces that foster inclusivity is imperative and this presentation looks at several neurotypes, in particular ADHD, autism and dementia, their signs and symptoms and the effect a well-designed, inclusive environment can have on the individual.
Inclusive design celebrates the vast diversity of human experiences by putting people at the heart of the process from the start. But it’s not about designing to the common denominator, nor at the expense of creativity. The presentation looks at specific challenges and individual needs focussing on sensory processing, executive functioning, and emotional regulation. It then looks at how we can design for life highlighting key considerations for designing environments specifically with hypersensitivities and hyposensitivities in mind, as well as dementia.

By the time the event takes place, there will be a RIBA accredited CPD and a virtual reality empathy platform to showcase a truly inclusive environment.

Speaker:

16:20 - 16:40

A Therapeutic Approach to Mental Health Design

This DiMHN presentation would explore the possibility that allowing service-users to engage in a greater variety of meaningful activities independently or with some degree of supervision reduces negative incidents. The new in-patient facilities at the Springfield University Hospital in South London are test cases to see whether designing for therapeutic benefit generates better outcomes. The initial data shows a significant reduction of incidents. Perhaps the path to safer environments doesn’t only mean designing-out risks. Perhaps environments where service-users are empowered to engage in meaningful activities of their own choice can lead towards a safer model of mental healthcare.

Designing out risk is the prevalent attitude of NHS management, consultants, designers and clinicians. The industry that provides products for mental health facilities is likewise directly responding to the possibility that terrible things can, and on rare occasions, do happen. This means that mental health products and facilities are designed primarily to address risks of self-harm or violent attack; as a result, they are heavy, uncomfortable, visually unappealing and stigmatising. They reinforce the subtle but unmistakable message of underlying control, threat and danger.

A set of primary design aspirations repeatedly surfaced in over 650 service-user consultations; these are the basis of an approach that designs around risk:
• Less Dreary: Avoiding monotony, providing opportunities to engage in beneficial, self-guided activities.
• Greener and Freer: Free access to gardens and outdoor space.
• Quieter: Full sound insulation between rooms. Acoustic dampening of airborne sound.
• Brighter: Ample daylight and views of the sky. External views.
• Fresher: Plentiful fresh air and natural ventilation. Comfort cooling of common rooms.
• Safer: ‘Avoidability’ – providing a choice of routes to get from A to B. Good sightlines and visibility for both staff and service users.
• Avoiding Stigma: A hospital where service users, staff and carers feel comfortable, valued and safe

Speakers:

16:40 - 17:00

Making Informed Choices: Partitioning Systems for Mental Health

Speakers:

17:00 - 19:30

Awards Ceremony

09:15 - 09:30

CEO Welcome

Speaker:

09:30 - 10:30

Keynote: HMP Stirling – Therapeutic and Trauma Informed Approaches to Custodial Design

HMP & YOI Stirling is a groundbreaking new custodial facility for Women in custody in Scotland. The design is heavily focus on mental wellbeing and a trauma informed approach to design, creating a therapeutic environment with landscape and nature at its core. The presentation seeks to explain the ethos behind the concept design, how the brief has been developed with input from key stakeholders throughout the design process, how the design of the completed facility creates a wellbeing focused environment, and attempts to offer some anecdotal evidence on positive outcomes from occupants and the wider community.

 

Speaker:

10:30 - 11:00

Break

11:00 - 11:30

Collaboration and Co-Production – Impact on Design at RIS:ES Bexhill

Trust: Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
Architects & Interior Designers: Gilling Dod
PSCP: Kier

The design journey for RIS:ES has been one of co-production and collaboration which has been embraced by all stakeholders. The building brings together a variety of healthcare specialisms, including working age adult and older adult inpatient wards, with medical education and neuromodulation departments.

RIS:ES is to replace the existing Department of Psychiatry facilities in Eastbourne which has dormitory accommodation, restricted access to garden spaces, and is set in the clinical setting of Eastbourne District General Hospital.

Experts by experience have been at the core of the RIS:ES story, sharing their expertise and insights every step of the way with positivity and care. Their input has informed all aspects of the building design from the little details such as having tables with rounded corner in meeting rooms, to the big picture principles around room adjacencies and garden spaces.

The co-production approach has developed an innovated X-shaped ward typology which provides two gardens spaces per ward, en-suite bedrooms clustered into 3 groups of 6, single sided bedroom corridors, and connectivity to adjacent wards.

Trauma-informed, dementia-friendly, and neurodiversity-friendly design principles have been implemented and tested with trust specialists in those fields.

Co-production with staff has helped implement a diverse provision for staff welfare with localised staff rest room, lockers, changing rooms, and showers to each department.

Applying lessons learned also informed design, not least in the bedrooms. The P22 repeatable room bed position most preferred by service users was adopted. Half bay windows were added to provide a view out to landscaped grounds directly from the bed position.

This co-production approach has extended into the construction phase, with the PSCP Kier turning the collaborative working into the reality of a physical building.

RIS:ES is due to open in 2025.

Speakers:

  • Ed Dwight Senior Project Manager - Kier Construction Southern
  • Richard Barton Expert by Experience - Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Paula Kirkland Programme Director, Redesigning Inpatients Services in East Sussex (RIS:ES) - Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Robin Graham Gilling Dod Architects
11:30 - 12:00

Seclusion Spaces Within NHS

‘Seclusion refers to the supervised confinement and isolation of a patient, away from other patients, in an area from which the patient is prevented from leaving, where it is of immediate necessity for the purpose of the containment of severe behavioural disturbance which is likely to cause harm to others.’ – Mental Health Act, 1983. The demand for these types of spaces were due to increased mental health demand and acuity linked to Covid-19. The previous system meant that patients were taken off-ward which had negative effects including: increased state of despair to the service user; increase safety risk to staff members whilst escorting to and from distant seclusion spaces; reduced staff numbers on the wards as a result of transfer off-ward; and Covid-19 related safety issues. This person centred approach helped to provide psychological informed environments and improve safety for staff and patients. The presentation will consist of the emergence of Seclusion suites drawing on the design of MPUFT’s examples/ case studies at Redwoods, Shrewsbury and St Georges Hospital, Stafford. The Redwoods seclusion suite was a purpose-built inpatient facility for adults with acute mental health problems, dementia and rehabilitation needs. It will outline outcomes, challenges and successes in relation to previously delivered projects to enhance learning on clinical, operational and estates areas within the NHS. It will focus on the key features and main design elements for seclusion and detailed accounts from clinical staff on their views and lessons learnt. From delivering multiple seclusion suites (new build and refurbishments) we feel that MPUFT provide the relevant expertise to enhance awareness and importance of seclusion in the overall healthcare sector.

Speaker:

  • Michelle Evans Associate Director of Capital - Midlands Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
12:00 - 13:30

Lunch

13:30 - 14:30

Keynote: Art Insists The Walls Be Kind

Speaker:

  • Dolly Sen Artist - Mental Health & Justice Project
14:30 - 15:00

Arts For Arts Sake? Examining the Function of Art in Mental Health Settings: a Review of the Evidence

In this paper, we present the main themes included in this year's 'Design with People in Mind' publication, relating to the function of art in mental health settings. We will review the academic evidence and examine the outcomes of key innovative projects seeking to bring art into mental health environments and discuss whether claims surrounding the potential for art to contribute to recovery and healing, are valid.

Using our 'Vital Spaces' framework which emphasises the importance of vitality, as well as psychological and physical safety in mental health settings we examine whether art can meaningfully contribute to a felt sense of care and explore its role in facilitating recovery. Our aim is to glance a critical eye over recent initiatives to introduce art in hospital buildings and present interview data with experts by experience, activists and practitioners on the benefits and potential drawbacks of this approach.

Speakers:

  • Michael Leahy Research Associate - National Institute for Health and Care Research
  • Professor Paula Reavey Professor of Psychology and Mental Health - MSc Mental Health & Clinical Psychology London South Bank University
15:00 - 15:30

The Art of Wellbeing: Mental Health Recovery by Design

This presentation will explore a joint project undertaken by the University of Lincoln and NHS Lincolnshire Partnership Foundation Trust (LPFT). In 2020 LPFT secured substantial funding to undertake the eradication of dormitory accommodation by designing and building an extension to the Peter Hodgkinson Acute Mental Health Centre at Lincoln County Hospital. As part of this project University of Lincoln colleagues Dr Steve Fossey (Associate Professor in Fine Art) and Rachel Baynton (Associate Professor and Creative Producer) were asked to design and lead a series of workshops with students, patients, and experts by experience to co-design two large artworks drawing on principles of mindfulness and grounding. These artworks were completed in 2023 and now support a therapeutic healing environment at the centre.

Leading on from the creation and installation of the artworks, Fossey and Baynton developed an innovative 3D digital model of the new facilities and the artworks in situ to enable a greater understanding of how acute mental health facilities are designed and used, and how art enables recovery. Using visualisation software, the new building is now accessible as a virtual space that is creating opportunities for enhanced staff training. The workshops that led to the production of the artworks and the 3D visualisation that provides greater accessibility for both staff and the public are part of what Fossey and Baynton see as a novel approach to wellbeing design. The term 'design' is used to embody a multicomponent, multimodal approach to improving wellbeing which imbricates community engagement, patient-student workshop collaboration, installation of art in hospitals, and the utilising of interactive technologies in mental health facilities. The latest phase of the project has seen Fossey and Baynton working with occupational therapists to design a creative toolkit for use on the wards. For the Design in Mental Health Conference Fossey and Baynton will present the 3D digital model, using it as a platform to communicate this multicomponent approach to mental health recovery by design.

Speakers:

15:30 - 16:00

Break