Sound Design – a Person Centred, Sensory Approach to Room Acoustics

Time: 12:20 - 12:40

Date: 9 June 2022

9-june-2022 12:20 9-june-2022 12:40 Europe/London Sound Design – a Person Centred, Sensory Approach to Room Acoustics

The information we receive from our senses helps us interpret the world around us. Sometimes this messaging can be affected especially when people are hypersensitive to sensory stimuli. Whilst our senses do not work in isolation, noise in particular can have an identifiable negative impact on our health and well-being. Recognised as a stressor, noise… Read more »

Design in Mental Health

Synopsis

The information we receive from our senses helps us interpret the world around us. Sometimes this messaging can be affected especially when people are hypersensitive to sensory stimuli.
Whilst our senses do not work in isolation, noise in particular can have an identifiable negative impact on our health and well-being. Recognised as a stressor, noise forms a key aspect of our body’s danger and alert mechanism; triggering a physiological and behavioural reaction.
The human response to sound links to and is affected by many factors including personality, age, previous experiences, mental health, health conditions, medication and neurodiversity.
Our reaction is often negative and emotional, varying from mild annoyance, to anger, agitation and feelings of helplessness. This is often reinforced when we are unable to affect or control the source of the noise; so when we cannot mute it, or switch it off.

By learning more about the impacts of poor acoustic design of a space and linking this to the possible effect it will have on users, buildings can be constructed to avoid common acoustic challenges that frequently result in a negative response. From this base consideration can then be given to how sound can be positively used and managed to meet the needs of individuals.

Speakers

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