Can Five Minutes Activity Five Minutes Before a Meal Time Impact on the Health and Wellbeing of People Living with Dementia

Time: 10:10 - 10:30

Date: 8 June 2022

8-june-2022 10:10 8-june-2022 10:30 Europe/London Can Five Minutes Activity Five Minutes Before a Meal Time Impact on the Health and Wellbeing of People Living with Dementia

L&M Healthcare’s Whittle Hall in Warrington was shortlisted as a finalist in five awards last year, winning one and coming second in another for a pilot study they conducted to see if just five minutes of activity for just five minutes before a meal improved the health and well-being of its residents. The study was… Read more »

Design in Mental Health

Synopsis

L&M Healthcare’s Whittle Hall in Warrington was shortlisted as a finalist in five awards last year, winning one and coming second in another for a pilot study they conducted to see if just five minutes of activity for just five minutes before a meal improved the health and well-being of its residents.

The study was designed to see if an improvement in weight, nutrition, socialisation & interaction could be achieved. 10 participants were selected from their two dementia plus units. (These were residents who have more complex needs and challenging behaviours and were the people who could potentially get the most benefit from this study.) Two different activities were alternated before lunch and teatime; a music based interactive activity called the Jolly Trolley and light projected interactive table-based activity called the Tovertafel and they then filmed what happened.

10 residents were chosen to take part and the project culminated with a pop-up restaurant experience which some family members attended.

Amazing results were achieved
• All but one participant gained weight, in total the group gained 10 kilos.
• Mealtimes were calmer.
• People who were usually assisted to eat ate by themselves
• People were more sociable.
• Positive behaviours were seen that we had not seen before.

Throughout the evaluation period all the residents were alert, engaged and participating in activities;
• Residents began communicating with each other. Despite aphasic (difficulty in comprehending or formulating) language, interaction was still present, non-verbal exchanges were often positive smiling, laughing and the tone of voice used was playful despite the absence of meaningful language.
• Hand function seemed to improve.
• Motor skills seemed to improve or be regained.
• Consumption of food and drink increased.
• There was an increase in autonomy and independence – people who normally required assistance began eating without support and poured themselves drinks.
• Increase in language/communications between residents and staff and with fellow residents
• Increase in eye contact and engagement.

Speakers

« Back